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Archives for : April2010

Rugged N Raw | I’m Broke And Proud f/Hasan Salaam

Rugged N Raw | I’m Broke And Proud f/Hasan Salaam from Noisemaker Media on Vimeo.

Hasan Salaam “Children of God”

By 2008, the greatest universal appraisal of a culture didn’t match the state of satisfaction of the people who live in the home of the culture’s birth. Why? It could be possibly due to their understanding that the grasp of the art they created is no longer in their control, at least in the corporate level. Hip Hop has been called dead and malnourished among other names. Then almost every other MC claimed a messianic title that they couldn’t walk in, because they were shallowly confident that swagger was the element necessary to revive the joy and pride of Rap’s listeners, spitting what they thought “the people wanted to hear”. The proposition of the corporate redneck offered a sucka MC to make coons with tunes that would change moods, from considering a study of the various options to improve the quality of life, to just wanting to dance all day, even in their stiff seats within a small cubicle that resembles a Japanese cell block with your kids’ pictures adorning them, for a sense of humanity.
But beneath the surface always emerges one who can swallow his/her pride and walk the water of substantial principles that will bind the people through their core commonalities. Hasan Salaam is one of those few, who I and many others elect (just check any of his shows) as the one who embodies the honor of rocking the mic while speaking on what is exactly reflecting those interior chambers of his heart. The “Children of God” may have a new musical opus that resembles a tool inspirational enough to dig out of the embraced grave that has been a poor excuse to show for what we love of the past 500 years.
“Mom’s glaucoma got her losing her vision
Pray it stays long enough for her to see some grandchildren
Most use religion, holding on by a string
Wifey gave back the ring, so no queen for the king”
- Hasan Salaam on “Best Time to Pray”
Hasan places his daily subjects of concern into the forefront as if to mark his identification with the rest of the people. “Insomniac PT. 1 (Nightfall)” which features DJ GI Joe, presents Hasan making comparisons of the imbalances between what people need and want, with statements such as, “the hood is looking like prime real estate / prison’s big business there, slated to incorporate.” If such information was commonly thought about, the average petty thief would reconsider some new choices, hopefully. The jewels and advices offered in this song promote a balance in idealism and practicality, that would constitute for what is called common sense. And the loud blaring horns in the hook guarantee a greater degree of agreement through head nodding.
“The History of Violence” features Badsportt, reflecting on his reaction to finding how Puerto Ricans were formed from a Columbian invasion, over a sinister sounding piano loop that could harbor DMX’s darkest horror core tales. Salaam then presents a verbal collage that shows a systematic white domination over the world through horrendous violence that disrupts the rhythm of already existing cultures, massacres in 2nd nature like habit, and creates the details of a global holocaust starting with the African slave trade.
“USA equals KKK, same as it was then,
It done stayed that way,
From them firebombing 4 girls in church in Alabama,
to smart bombs hitting mosques killing civilians on camera,
What you see in Iraq, been happening here,
For 500 years, but who the fuck cares?
No oil in the hood, just Black gold,
That’s been getting sold for its blood, sweat & tears…
… We getting popped here over petty things,
My hood, my block, and even what set you claim,
My advice is you study what you are and when,
Or else prepare for 500 years more, again…
- Hasan Salaam on “History of Violence”
One of the album’s highlights features Lord Jamar from Brand Nubian on “Angel Dust”. Jamar constructed an instrumental that havens an ol’ school, pimping kind of feel, like Goldie might just make an appearance somewhere. But if you’re familiar with Hasan’s music, you’re already aware that “Blaxploitation” is not exactly his steez. This tale provides the gritty details of a young vixen, whose appearances aren’t properly advertised in commercial videos. Today’s popular career require the exploitation of physical appearances, that bare the essentials out to the world, especially within the urban market, hence video girls, <a href=”http://mail.erdel.de/Redirect/hiphopdx.com” target=”_blank”>hiphopdx.com</a>’s “Beauty &amp; Brains”, King magazine and every other Hip Hop magazine’s “eye candy” section.
“The Power-you’s a scorcher, once she put it on ya,
Gotcha hooked on her… Angel Dust,
Allow me to warn, she ain’t no good for ya,
That’s why they call her… Angel Dust,
Fiend for her, spoil her, pay bills, support her,
That’s why they call her… Angel Dust,
Can’t refuse the offer, once she put it on ya,
Gotcha hooked on her… Angel Dust”
- Hasan Salaam on “Angel Dust”
Some men now a day may find it a bit too easy to be judged a nice guy, with all the benefits and losses of such a title, but this girl’s not looking for that. She’s mastered the repetitive episodes of foul treatment to a point where “it ain’t what she’s chasing, but what she’s escaping.” This song personally reminds me of the kind of girl Tupac was speaking on in “Wonda Why They Call U Bitch”. The lady in the discussion is the kind who lives with the depression hidden and defends it with an attitude of conceit and her “love” comes with an invested idea in cashing in. But the distinction in this tale provides an inner look into the kind of the experiences that produce such a mentality where integrity is worth sacrificing for the profit.
“Finally through the search, see the nature of the beast now,
Script life like 16s, but live it like a freestyle”
- Majesty and Hasan Salaam on “Deliver My Soul”
Next the scope of magnification is placed upon self as Hasan features Majesty and Maya Azucena in what continues the discussion of self concession on “Deliver My Soul”. The reality of poverty’s ills and working worthless jobs for low wages is the perfect breeding ground that inspired Hasan and Majesty to indulge in what brought immediate ends to meet while the guilt equally builds within. And while Hasan and Majesty trade experiences and lessons, Maya’s subtle appearance (opposing her feature on Immortal Technique’s “Crimes of the Heart”) served as an instrument itself that heightened the gravity of this topic, that to many is all too easy and even a given.
Hasan’s music doesn’t exclude having fun, I mean it is Hip-Hop. And the series of “The Uprock” featuring Masta Ace &amp; “The Downrock” featuring Rugged &amp; Raw, Badsportt &amp; Smarty Pants, display a Hasan who’s simply taking his skill to the fundamentals of lyrics and mic rocking. While “The Uprock” provides a production that is expected of for Hasan, “The Downrock” appears like a visit into RNR’s chamber on Hasan’s album, trying to get “Louder! Louder!”
“Kids no longer separate life from entertainment,
&amp; with all the gangsta shit, no one explains an affidavit,
Your ghostwriters ain’t coming out to your arraignment,
Emulating your favorite rappers a pains taking engagement”
- Hasan Salaam on “15 Minutes”
The album’s first video “15 Minutes” dictates that “the world is just a stage everybody is on, you can only get played by the game so long.” Many crab in the rat race in chase of those “15 Minutes”, and approve of all that is asked of them to give up for that little bit. Hasan’s advance however, doesn’t trade dignity for it. This song’s not hating some commercial rappers’ successes, but rather a class for those studying the Rap game from the outside and allowing their selves to be molded into being the next whoever they saw make it, to be awarded by the Grammy’s and MTV Cribs. Apparently making music that is appreciated by the world will change the life of anyone who has nothing, but the seriousness applied to making music implies it to be another job instead of an art loved.
There are many jewels in this musical manuscript such as “Suga” where Hasan indulges in the beauty of who he loves and reveals a greater state of maturity in stating, “I stand in love with you, I don’t fall for nothing”. “Children of God” defines this album as it depicts that while angel dust can deliver your soul, redemption is always possible, as the flaws are natural in the path of the ideal. “Someplace” speaks on the violence that exists in the act of gentrification and even has a vibe that artists from various genres would partake in, as the music itself can be interpreted in multiple ways. “Blessed” is a beautiful poem of hope for better days verbalized by Aja, Elijah and Sos eloquently supplying harmony with her violin. The album’s outro titled “Bonus 4” a/k/a “Prelude to Life in Black &amp; White”, after 3 bonus tracks of silence, revolves around one of the opus’ underlying themes, which is reflective of the society we currently live in, being Black and White. This declaration of independence is rhymed over an old Jazz instrumental that seemed fit for Hector Lavoe or Nina Simone.
“Children of God” takes the place of a serious testament that reminds us of the daily issues that all share disregarding the dominating feeling of individuality and isolation, such as poverty, dignity, death, hope, racism, unity, subjugation and freedom. Regardless of the type of walk we walk, we live in cooperation within what is known as a white male supremacist system. Hasan’s humble approach is balanced with self awareness, love and applicable strategies of everyday survival. Welcome the “Children of God.”

By 2008, the greatest universal appraisal of a culture didn’t match the state of satisfaction of the people who live in the home of the culture’s birth. Why? It could be possibly due to their understanding that the grasp of the art they created is no longer in their control, at least in the corporate level. Hip Hop has been called dead and malnourished among other names. Then almost every other MC claimed a messianic title that they couldn’t walk in, because they were shallowly confident that swagger was the element necessary to revive the joy and pride of Rap’s listeners, spitting what they thought “the people wanted to hear”. The proposition of the corporate redneck offered a sucka MC to make coons with tunes that would change moods, from considering a study of the various options to improve the quality of life, to just wanting to dance all day, even in their stiff seats within a small cubicle that resembles a Japanese cell block with your kids’ pictures adorning them, for a sense of humanity.
But beneath the surface always emerges one who can swallow his/her pride and walk the water of substantial principles that will bind the people through their core commonalities. Hasan Salaam is one of those few, who I and many others elect (just check any of his shows) as the one who embodies the honor of rocking the mic while speaking on what is exactly reflecting those interior chambers of his heart. The “Children of God” may have a new musical opus that resembles a tool inspirational enough to dig out of the embraced grave that has been a poor excuse to show for what we love of the past 500 years.
“Mom’s glaucoma got her losing her visionPray it stays long enough for her to see some grandchildrenMost use religion, holding on by a stringWifey gave back the ring, so no queen for the king”- Hasan Salaam on “Best Time to Pray”
Hasan places his daily subjects of concern into the forefront as if to mark his identification with the rest of the people. “Insomniac PT. 1 (Nightfall)” which features DJ GI Joe, presents Hasan making comparisons of the imbalances between what people need and want, with statements such as, “the hood is looking like prime real estate / prison’s big business there, slated to incorporate.” If such information was commonly thought about, the average petty thief would reconsider some new choices, hopefully. The jewels and advices offered in this song promote a balance in idealism and practicality, that would constitute for what is called common sense. And the loud blaring horns in the hook guarantee a greater degree of agreement through head nodding.
“The History of Violence” features Badsportt, reflecting on his reaction to finding how Puerto Ricans were formed from a Columbian invasion, over a sinister sounding piano loop that could harbor DMX’s darkest horror core tales. Salaam then presents a verbal collage that shows a systematic white domination over the world through horrendous violence that disrupts the rhythm of already existing cultures, massacres in 2nd nature like habit, and creates the details of a global holocaust starting with the African slave trade.
“USA equals KKK, same as it was then,It done stayed that way,From them firebombing 4 girls in church in Alabama,to smart bombs hitting mosques killing civilians on camera,What you see in Iraq, been happening here,For 500 years, but who the fuck cares?No oil in the hood, just Black gold,That’s been getting sold for its blood, sweat &amp; tears…… We getting popped here over petty things,My hood, my block, and even what set you claim,My advice is you study what you are and when,Or else prepare for 500 years more, again…- Hasan Salaam on “History of Violence”
One of the album’s highlights features Lord Jamar from Brand Nubian on “Angel Dust”. Jamar constructed an instrumental that havens an ol’ school, pimping kind of feel, like Goldie might just make an appearance somewhere. But if you’re familiar with Hasan’s music, you’re already aware that “Blaxploitation” is not exactly his steez. This tale provides the gritty details of a young vixen, whose appearances aren’t properly advertised in commercial videos. Today’s popular career require the exploitation of physical appearances, that bare the essentials out to the world, especially within the urban market, hence video girls, <a href=”http://mail.erdel.de/Redirect/hiphopdx.com” target=”_blank”>hiphopdx.com</a>’s “Beauty &amp; Brains”, King magazine and every other Hip Hop magazine’s “eye candy” section.
“The Power-you’s a scorcher, once she put it on ya,Gotcha hooked on her… Angel Dust,Allow me to warn, she ain’t no good for ya,That’s why they call her… Angel Dust,Fiend for her, spoil her, pay bills, support her,That’s why they call her… Angel Dust,Can’t refuse the offer, once she put it on ya,Gotcha hooked on her… Angel Dust”- Hasan Salaam on “Angel Dust”
Some men now a day may find it a bit too easy to be judged a nice guy, with all the benefits and losses of such a title, but this girl’s not looking for that. She’s mastered the repetitive episodes of foul treatment to a point where “it ain’t what she’s chasing, but what she’s escaping.” This song personally reminds me of the kind of girl Tupac was speaking on in “Wonda Why They Call U Bitch”. The lady in the discussion is the kind who lives with the depression hidden and defends it with an attitude of conceit and her “love” comes with an invested idea in cashing in. But the distinction in this tale provides an inner look into the kind of the experiences that produce such a mentality where integrity is worth sacrificing for the profit.
“Finally through the search, see the nature of the beast now,Script life like 16s, but live it like a freestyle”- Majesty and Hasan Salaam on “Deliver My Soul”
Next the scope of magnification is placed upon self as Hasan features Majesty and Maya Azucena in what continues the discussion of self concession on “Deliver My Soul”. The reality of poverty’s ills and working worthless jobs for low wages is the perfect breeding ground that inspired Hasan and Majesty to indulge in what brought immediate ends to meet while the guilt equally builds within. And while Hasan and Majesty trade experiences and lessons, Maya’s subtle appearance (opposing her feature on Immortal Technique’s “Crimes of the Heart”) served as an instrument itself that heightened the gravity of this topic, that to many is all too easy and even a given.
Hasan’s music doesn’t exclude having fun, I mean it is Hip-Hop. And the series of “The Uprock” featuring Masta Ace &amp; “The Downrock” featuring Rugged &amp; Raw, Badsportt &amp; Smarty Pants, display a Hasan who’s simply taking his skill to the fundamentals of lyrics and mic rocking. While “The Uprock” provides a production that is expected of for Hasan, “The Downrock” appears like a visit into RNR’s chamber on Hasan’s album, trying to get “Louder! Louder!”
“Kids no longer separate life from entertainment,&amp; with all the gangsta shit, no one explains an affidavit,Your ghostwriters ain’t coming out to your arraignment,Emulating your favorite rappers a pains taking engagement”- Hasan Salaam on “15 Minutes”
The album’s first video “15 Minutes” dictates that “the world is just a stage everybody is on, you can only get played by the game so long.” Many crab in the rat race in chase of those “15 Minutes”, and approve of all that is asked of them to give up for that little bit. Hasan’s advance however, doesn’t trade dignity for it. This song’s not hating some commercial rappers’ successes, but rather a class for those studying the Rap game from the outside and allowing their selves to be molded into being the next whoever they saw make it, to be awarded by the Grammy’s and MTV Cribs. Apparently making music that is appreciated by the world will change the life of anyone who has nothing, but the seriousness applied to making music implies it to be another job instead of an art loved.
There are many jewels in this musical manuscript such as “Suga” where Hasan indulges in the beauty of who he loves and reveals a greater state of maturity in stating, “I stand in love with you, I don’t fall for nothing”. “Children of God” defines this album as it depicts that while angel dust can deliver your soul, redemption is always possible, as the flaws are natural in the path of the ideal. “Someplace” speaks on the violence that exists in the act of gentrification and even has a vibe that artists from various genres would partake in, as the music itself can be interpreted in multiple ways. “Blessed” is a beautiful poem of hope for better days verbalized by Aja, Elijah and Sos eloquently supplying harmony with her violin. The album’s outro titled “Bonus 4” a/k/a “Prelude to Life in Black &amp; White”, after 3 bonus tracks of silence, revolves around one of the opus’ underlying themes, which is reflective of the society we currently live in, being Black and White. This declaration of independence is rhymed over an old Jazz instrumental that seemed fit for Hector Lavoe or Nina Simone.
“Children of God” takes the place of a serious testament that reminds us of the daily issues that all share disregarding the dominating feeling of individuality and isolation, such as poverty, dignity, death, hope, racism, unity, subjugation and freedom. Regardless of the type of walk we walk, we live in cooperation within what is known as a white male supremacist system. Hasan’s humble approach is balanced with self awareness, love and applicable strategies of everyday survival. Welcome the “Children of God.”

Hip-Hop in Divino

Hip-Hop today is still being consistently questioned in regard of its current state of vitality, its state of purity, or its medical condition sort to say. But to me while America expands its military presence into the Middle Eastern region so does Hip-Hop. Recently I viewed Slingshot Hip Hop’s documentary about Hip Hop’s new emergence in the Gaza Strip and in Palestine, which shows that Hip-Hop is so much greater than what is being debated to be in the 50 States and in such a greater state than it is being recognized in.

Hip-Hop today is still being consistently questioned in regard of its current state of vitality, its state of purity, or its medical condition sort to say. But to me while America expands its military presence into the Middle Eastern region so does Hip-Hop. Recently I viewed Slingshot Hip Hop’s documentary about Hip Hop’s new emergence in the Gaza Strip and in Palestine, which shows that Hip-Hop is so much greater than what is being debated to be in the 50 States and in such a greater state than it is being recognized in.

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